Tips should not replace salary

Tips should not replace salary Debate arises following Ontario Liberals’ vote to maintain lower minimum wage for liquor servers Clara Geddes At first glance, the provincial Liberals’ new legislation seems like a win for the labour movement. With policies from equal pay for part-time employees, to the creation of a 17-week leave for victims of sexual assault, to a $15 minimum wage in 2019, it can be easy to overlook one glaring flaw in Ontario’s labour regulation: in May, a government-commissioned report recommended the elimination of the minimum wage exemption for liquor servers, who generally make most of their income in tips. When the NDP proposed the creation of this amendment in August, the Liberal majority voted against it. Liquor servers in both Ontario and British Columbia are paid a lower minimum wage. In Quebec, there is a separate, and lower, minimum wage for all tipped employees. In light of this policy change, now is the time to discuss why gratuities should not replace salary. The size of a gratuity is supposed to reflect a server’s ability and effort, but Professor Michael Lynn of Cornell University would argue otherwise. Having broken down the factors that determine the size of a tip, he found that only four percent of the average gratuity depends on the actual quality of service. He found many meaningless reasons people subconsciously tip higher amounts. This...

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